Photo Requirements for Portraits

The photographs I receive and use as references for my artwork is the absolutely most significant part of the painting process. Since I work from photos, the completed portrait depends on the quality of the photos you send me.

 

The Photo is key, so please provide with the best photos you have and try to send as many photos as possible. If you would like to photograph your pet specifically for a portrait, you might find the information below even more helpful. Any questions? You are more than welcome to contact me at any time.

 

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Natural Lighting

Whenever it is possible, try to take photos outside in natural light rather than inside with flash. Even though it is often preferred to take photos on a sunny day, try to avoid photos with strong sunlight or too dark shadows which would make the pets colors fade away.

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Photo Size

Try to email me your photos in original size, downloaded directly from your camera. If photos are reduced in size they are less clear, sharp and much important information is lost. The amount of pixels can vary depending on which digital format you are using.

Fill The Entire Frame

If you would like to commission a full-body painting or drawing, try not to stand too far away from your pet. Fill the frame with a little background with your pet as the most important part of the photo.

 

A photo with the subject too far away on the photo scenery probably won't make a clear and sharp subject. For a head and chest portrait, take a photo where your pet is filling the entire frame without cropping parts (ears, part of neck and so on) which you would like to include in the portrait. If you would like a head and chest portrait and only have a full-body photo, I can’t zoom into the head to see more details.

 

More zoom doesn’t mean more detail or information within the photo. Actually, if I zoom in a small part in a large photograph that part is usually quite blurry. I can only paint what I see, so I would like to have room for excluding details rather than making things up.

 

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